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Case Studies In Metro Vancouver

The following case studies explore some generic options for reducing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in two neighbourhood types in Metro Vancouver. The Richmond case study explores redevelopment options for an existing mall site. The Surrey case explores different community designs and renewable energy resources for a typical residential block.

THE RICHMOND CASE STUDY

EXPLORING ENERGY IN THE CONTEXT OF A CITY CENTRE

The Richmond case study explores opportunities for integrating renewable energy into a city centre neighbourhood. The area around Landsdowne Mall is used to help demonstrate what these changes might look like in practice.
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Richmond

THE EXISTING CONDITIONS

LOW DENSITY AND ENERGY INEFFICIENT BUILDINGS

In its current condition, the residential density of the area is relatively low compared to other urban areas in Richmond. The buildings tend to have poor insulation and inefficient furnaces and windows. The current residential energy use of the area is about 165,000 GWh per year. About 65% of this energy is supplied by natural gas and the remainder supplied by electricity.



Landsdowne Mall, Richmond
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EXPLORING ALTERNATIVES

WHAT WOULD A MORE SUSTAINABLE NEIGHBOURHOOD LOOK LIKE?

Three scenarios were examined to explore opportunities for developing a more sustainable neighbourhood. Each scenario builds upon the previous and integrates energy technologies that can already be found in use across Metro Vancouver.




Richmond Scenario build outs
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    Existing conditions

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    Density is maximized and buildings are built to the latest building code.

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    Solar hot water and photovoltaic panels are installed on the rooftops of new buildings.

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    A biomass energy plant and geoexchange loop are integrated into a district energy system.





THE Surrey CASE STUDY

Low density residential growth

The City of Surrey is expected to add 300,000 people to its popoulation over the next three decades, surpassing Vancouver as the largest city in British Columbia. While some of this growth will be located in dense urban nodes, growth will also take the form of low density suburban developments.
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Surrey

Sustainable Suburbs

Exploring Energy in the context of a suburban block

The Surrey case study explores opportunities for integrating renewable energy into a new suburban neighbourhood. Similar low density residential greenfield development patters can be found across Metro Vancouver. Can these neighbourhoods be designed to maintain their low density characeter while also reducing energy use and emissions?



Low Density Residential
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EXPLORING ALTERNATIVES

WHAT WOULD A MORE SUSTAINABLE NEIGHBOURHOOD LOOK LIKE?

The same generic residential block is compared using three different housing types. In each case potential renewable energy technologies are assessed. Each block is then compared based on energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.




Surrey Scenario build outs



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    Large lot single family houses.

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    Small lot single family houses.

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    Rowhouses.





Community Energy Explorer
Based on the PhD work of Rory Tooke at CALP
Web design and development by Dave Peacock
Funding provided by Metro Vancouver,
Neptis Foundation, Real Estate Foundation of BC,
the Vancouver Foundation, and PICS

CALP Production team: Rory Tooke, Sara Barron, Joseph Lee, Nikki Ng, Stephen Sheppard, Sara Muir-Owen (PICS), and Ron Kellett (Elements Lab). With support from Jason Emmert and Metro Vancouver staff, staff of City of Richmond and City of Surrey, and citizen representatives from those cities.

Download the Illustrated Guide to Community Energy